Chocolate and Strawberries

Chef's Corner

Because only the best commercial ovens keep your kitchens running like they need to.

Chocolate and Strawberries

fondue Strawberries

Valentine’s Day is this Friday and many restaurant menus will feature variations of chocolate and strawberry desserts.   Strawberries are jewels of deliciousness and highly versatile, but did you know according to a Yale study, strawberries ranked 100 (highest possible score) in the ‘Overall Nutritional Quality Index’ (ONQI) system?  Being extremely nutrient dense, strawberries are one of the healthiest fruit choices.

Ever notice the strawberry is the shape of a heart? This could be a hint of the nutrients in this heart healthy fruit.  Research conducted by the USDA indicates the berries help fight against cancer, heart disease, and other illnesses.  According to the USDA Nutrient Database, strawberries are sodium-free, fat-free, cholesterol-free, and low calorie.  This berry is also nutrient packed: approximately 8 strawberries provide more vitamin C than an orange and provide the recommended vitamin dose per day.

Customers will enjoy this craveable combination of strawberries and chocolate.

Chocolate Fondue

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup (180 g) semisweet chocolate chips
  • ½ cup (125 mL) whipping cream

Procedure:

1.)    Place chocolate chips in a ceramic bowl. Pour whipping cream over.

2.)    Preheat JET to 300°F (150°C), and place bowl inside at the following setting :

JET14
Stage Time MW%
1 1:00 60
2 0:30 50

 

JET19
Stage Time MW%
1 0:45 60
2 0:25 50

3.)    Stir well with high heat spatula, being careful to break up chocolate lumps.

strawberries

Grilled Cheese in Tomato Soup

Chef's Corner

Because only the best commercial ovens keep your kitchens running like they need to.

Grilled Cheese in Tomato Soup

By: ACP Corporate Chef Sandy Gibilisco

As February begins, don’t just settle for crackers in your soup!  Use the MXP to make a Panini grilled cheese sandwich, cut it into bite sized pieces and scatter them over a bowl of steaming tomato soup.

tomato cheese soup

Assemble a grilled cheese sandwich and place on the Panini press accessory in the MXP for 30 seconds, while your tomato soup is heating.

Ingredients:

  • 2 (1/2-inch – 1.3 cm – thick slices country white bread)
  • 1 tablespoon (2 g)  butter, melted
  • 2 ounces Gruyere cheese, grated
  • 2 thick slices  Sharp Cheddar Cheese

Procedures:

  1. Brush 2 slices of bread lightly with melted butter and turn over.
  2. Sprinkle half of the unbuttered side with grated Gruyere on each of two of slices.
  3. Place a slice of sharp chedder on top of the Gruyere on each slice of bread.

Place in MXP on the following settings:

Stage 1:         15 sec           60% MW       20% AIR    100% IR
Stage 2:         10 sec           40% MW         0% AIR    100% IR

Remove both halves from oven and close sandwich. Allow to rest on cutting board for 1 minute. Cut into 1-inch cubes. Place pieces on top of a steaming bowl of soup. The toasty bread becomes a little soft and the cheese gets gooey in the hot soup. It’s sure to make your customers feel like a kid all over again.

tomato-cheese-soup

2014 Food Trends

Chef's Corner

Because only the best commercial ovens keep your kitchens running like they need to.

2014 Food Trends

veggies

In 2013, consumers saw sriracha, kale, and quinoa dominating restaurant menus on the healthy scene. In the indulgent corner, the introduction of the popular croissant-doughnut fused pastry known as the ‘cronut’ became the most talked about dessert item in culinary trends.

What food trends will drive the restaurant industry in 2014, and how can ACP products support those trends? There are several trends which lend themselves well to food prepared in ACP cooking platforms.

According to the National Restaurant Association survey, here are the top culinary trends which are likely to show up in 2014 restaurant menus:
1. Locally sourced meats and seafood

  • ACP high speed combination ovens are ideal for baking fish and seafood:   pre-breaded filets for quick service restaurants, grilled and baked delicate seafood for high end restaurants.

2. Locally grown produce

  • The RC, HDC and RFS ovens (1700 watts or higher) double as steamers to correctly steam produce to a tender-crisp texture quickly without water lines, and high power usage from restaurant steamers. The XpressTM line can grill and roast vegetables consistently cooked, with our GR10 Panini accessory or a standard ¼ sheet pan.

3. Environmental sustainability
According to Energy Star, commercial microwave ovens use up to 80% less energy than conventional ovens. All ACP microwave ovens use less than 75¢ of energy per day*:

  • 1000 watt models (RMS and RCS): 25¢/day
  • 1200 watt models (RFS and HDC): 30¢/day
  • 1700/1800 watt models (RFS, HDC and RC): 50¢/day
  • 2100/2200 watt models (HDC and RC): 53¢/day
  • 2400 watt models (On Cue™): 61¢/day
  • 3000 watt models (RC30S2): 73¢/day

*Parameters
Energy Costs: $0.10 kWh*
Cooking Time: 100 Minutes
Cook Cycles/Day: 100
Typical Cook Time: 1 minute

4. Healthful kids’ meals

  • The RC series is ideal for replacing steamers in schools and institutions. The spacious cavity holds two ½ sized Cambro pans to allow batch cooking of multiple items at once.
  • Xpress™ ovens cook chicken fingers and fries without frying oil, heat macaroni and cheese or pizza and exceed the required speed of service times in most restaurants.

5. Gluten-free cuisine

Supporting local suppliers is a high priority for restaurants to ensure the freshest ingredients.   Some chefs are now planting gardens and built farms for fresh and convenient ingredients near their restaurants.  It’s farm to fork, at one location.

Minicupcakestop

Other food trends shown to be on the “what’s hot” list include:
1.            Vegetarian appetizers (especially featuring cauliflower)
2.            Non-traditional fish (Branzino – a Mediterranean Sea Bass –  Arctic char – an Alaskan white fish)
3.            Hybrid/mini desserts
4.            Tea as an ingredient
5.            Upscale comfort foods

ACP offers a product line that provides the correct equipment to cook a variety of trending items:

      • Roasting vegetable medley in the Jetwave™
      • Boiling rice, pasta or quinoa as a side dish in the RC series
      • Baking a center of the plate seafood item in the Jetwave™
      • Baking mini cupcakes in the MXP

Food trends seem to be getting healthier.  ACP ovens are designed to inspire our customers to create healthy, on trend choices for restaurant patrons.

Sources:
http://www.qsrmagazine.com/reports/8-fast-food-trends-14
http://www.restaurant.org/Downloads/PDFs/News-Research/WhatsHot/What-s-Hot-2014.pdf

New Trans Fat Laws

Chef's Corner

Because only the best commercial ovens keep your kitchens running like they need to.

New Trans Fat Laws

FDA vs. Trans fat

transf at

Products with heart vascular-clogging trans fat have been slowly disappearing from grocery aisles and restaurant menus in the last decade.  In November, the Food and Drug Administration announced they are closing the final chapter on trans-fat content.

Since the 1990’s, several scientific studies and health advocacy groups have been calling for the restaurant industry to stop using partially hydrogenated oils (PHOs), the main source of trans fat and damaging ingredients for heart health. In 2006, FDA passed trans-fat labeling laws for food manufacturers. Last month, the FDA issued a Federal Register notice announcing their tentative determination that PHOs are no longer GRAS (generally recognized as safe) in food.  This would mean that, if finalized, food manufacturers would no longer be permitted to sell PHOs, without prior FDA approval for use as a food additive. However, before the decision is final, the FDA is encouraging food industry experts and others for public comment in the next 60 days to determine how long it would take food manufacturers to reformulate and remove all trans fats from products.

 What are trans fats and why do we care? 

Statements concerning trans-fat are seen everywhere, especially on the front of packaged food labels: “No trans fat!” or “0 grams trans fat!”, but what does it mean? Public awareness of this dangerous ingredient and trans fat content in the country’s diet has declined dramatically in the last decade, but they remain an area of significant public health concern.

 Trans fat: an unsaturated fatty acid that occurs as a result of the hydrogenation process, having a trans arrangement of carbon atoms adjacent to its double bonds.

The hydrogenation process adds hydrogen bonds to liquid fat and as a result, creates a solid fat.  This process makes the fat more stable, so it extends the shelf life of the product and improves product texture.

It is heavily used in fried and baked goods and margarine. Crisco, originally marketed in the beginning of the 20th century was a hallmark R&D invention, extending the shelf life of non-refrigerated products.

Common foods that contain trans fats:

  • Shortening
  • Margarine
  • Crackers
  • Microwave popcorn
  • Frozen pizzas
  • Pies
  • Other baked goods (40% of trans fat in diets come from these)
  • Fried foods
  • Many other processed foods

Trans fats act like saturated fats inside of the body; they both increase LDL (low density lipoprotein or “bad”) cholesterol levels. This leads to coronary disease and increase heart attack risks. More recent studies suggest trans fats can be linked to other health problems, such as inflammation and diabetes. According the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, removing processed trans fats in the diet can prevent up to 20,000 heart attacks, and 7,000 deaths from heart disease, each year.

Much of the restaurant industry and food manufacturers have already removed trans fats from their food items after the 2006 labeling law.   Since trans fats are stable at high temperatures, products that may need a bit more time in reformulation include products like pizza and some bakery products. As the use of trans fats slowly phase out and reformulated products pop up, this transition will change how we cook and how manufacturers develop new products.  Particular types of fat play a determining factor in food texture, flavor, appearance, nutrition, melting point, heat transfer and a variety of other essential food characteristics.

 

The Food and Drug Administration proposed measures In November, which would all but eliminate artery-clogging, artificial trans fats from the food supply. Denmark was the first country to virtually eliminate trans fat from foods in 2003.

The Food and Drug Administration will move quickly to determine a timeline of mandating that manufacturers eliminate all trans fat.  Since most companies have had nearly a decade to figure out what to do, the agency may make a ruling within to include a deadline of mid-2014.

ACP’s Xpress ™ ovens, MXP and Jetwave ™, are helping in the battle against trans fat by minimizing it’s use by cooking bake able products which are normally fried (ex: fries, eggrolls, chicken wings, chicken nuggets, etc.). Though no trans fat fry oil or fats are used, the ovens’ high intensity heat combined with convected air produce crispy and crunchy food products, with a “just-fried” taste.

Sources:

“A History of Trans Fat.” Heart.org. American Heart Association, 5 Aug. 2010. Web. 13       Dec. 2013.
“FDA Targets Trans Fat in Processed Foods.” FDA.gov. U.S. Food and Drug    Administration, 4 Dec. 2013. Web. 13 Dec. 2013.
Kotz, Deborah. “FDA Moves to Ban Trans Fat as Threat to Health.” BostonGlobe.com. The Boston Globe,
8 Nov. 2013. Web. 15 Dec. 2013.
Neporent, Liz. “5 Foods That Could Become Illegal With FDA Move to Ban Trans     Fats.”ABCNews.com.
ABC News Network, 07 Nov. 2013. Web. 14 Dec. 2013.

Melting Snowman Cookies

Chef's Corner

Because only the best commercial ovens keep your kitchens running like they need to.

Melting Snowman Cookies

As the colder weather arrives, bright hanging lights, warm beverages, and the nostalgia for holiday baked goods follow. Need some ideas this season for fun holiday treats to add to your menu?

ACP’s Xpress ovens forced air convection and gentle microwave quickly bake cookies.  The Jetwave™ produces soft and light sugar cookie for a unique and fun, decorated holiday cookie in just a few minutes.

photo

BAKING COOKIES:

Ingredients

  • Product: Pillsbury Sugar Cookies, 16.5 oz. (500 g) tube

Directions

1. Preheat MCE14 to 375°F (190°C).
2. Cut Pillsbury sugar cookies ¼ inch thick (0.6 cm) weighing approximately 1.2 ounces (34 g).
3. Place 6 raw cookies onto a ¼ sheet pan evenly spaced.
4. Bake at the following settings in the preheated MCE14:

Stage Time Microwave Level
1 1:35 10%
2 1:00 0%
3 0:40 10%
4 3:00 0%

5. Remove from oven and let sit at least 3 minutes before attempting to remove.

DECORATING COOKIES:

Ingredients

  • 6 large marshmallows
  • Cookie Icing (white)
  • Decorating Icing Tubes in Black, Green, Orange.
  • Red and Green mini M&M’s

Directions

1. Spread cookie with white icing with back of a spoon. Let some dribble over edge for a “puddle” look.
2. Cut marshmallow in half crosswise.
3. With the cut side facing down, draw a snowman face with black decorating tube; make sure there is enough space between eyes and mouth for the nose.

(Note: If the snowman is to have a ‘hat’, place a mini Reese’s peanut butter cup on top of the marshmallow, using a small amount of icing as ‘glue’.)

4. Use orange icing to pipe out a “carrot” for nose.
5. Carefully place marshmallow towards one edge of the cookie.
6. Use the green decorating tube to fashion a scarf by outlining the base of the snowman head, “tying” the scarf at the center of marshmallow base and letting ends flow down and towards the side.
7. Use black decorating tube to draw hands with 3 fingers starting at the sides of the scarf.
8. Place 3 or 4 Red and Green M&M’s in a row, below the tied scarf, for buttons.
9. Youngsters of all ages will enjoy!

Melting Snowman Cookies

2013 International Year of Quinoa

Chef's Corner

Because only the best commercial ovens keep your kitchens running like they need to.

2013 International Year of Quinoa

2013 International Year of Quinoa
By ACP Chef Sandy Gibilisco

quinoa

The year 2013 has been declared “The International Year of the Quinoa” (IYQ), recognizing the South American indigenous peoples for growing this unique super food.

Quinoa remains unfamiliar to many people, especially in the practical sense of cooking and recipes.

Quinoa (pronounced as Keen-wa) is always thought as a type of grain. The truth is contrary to this general belief, as quinoa is not a grain but seeds of a leafy plant related to spinach.

Quinoa is an organic food grown in the Andes Mountains of Ecuador. In Ecuador, it is known as ‘the Mother of all grains”.  It is a small, round; ‘grain’ that is easily cooked. Since water is added to hydrate, it absorbs any other base flavors added to the water, making it perfect flavor profile for a protein substitute, or salads.  Chefs are now using it as a gluten free alternative to pasta or wheat content foods and quinoa items are prevalent on US restaurant menus as a sought after,  gluten free alternative.

Quinoa is a versatile fluffy grain with a delicate, nutty flavor and a texture of slight crunch.

There are three varieties of quinoa which are most readily available in American markets, usually found near the rice products in grocery stores.  All are produced in South America.

  • Pearl quinoa – most available
  • Red quinoa – more costly – provides additional nutrients
  • Black quinoa – price comparison with red quinoa – provides additional nutrients

 Beneficial Facts

Diverse nutrient benefits of quinoa give it uniqueness among grain-related foods.

  • Quinoa has been singled out by Food as Drug Administration as a food with “high nutritive value”.
  • High in certain antioxidant phytonutrients and two flavonoids are now known to be provided by quinoa in especially concentrated amounts. The sometimes the concentration of these has been shown to be greater than high-flavonoid berries like cranberry or lingonberry.
  • High in anti-inflammatory phytonutrients.
  • Small amounts of the anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acid are also provided by quinoa.
  • Provides twice the amount of calcium content as found in whole wheat.
  • High in fiber content, providing 5 grams in ½ cup uncooked quinoa.
  • Quinoa needs be rinsed thoroughly to remove a bitter substance (saponin) that coats the seeds.

EASY RECIPE

ACP multi stage cooking microwaves produce a consistently cooked quinoa every time.

  • 1/3 size, 6 “ deep, high heat cambro with lid
  • 2 cups quinoa
  • 1 ¾ cups water
  • 1 crumbled bouillon cube, if desired (vegetable, beef or chicken)

Procedures:

  1. Rinse dry quinoa well, up to three times, using strainer.
  2. Place water, bouillon granules, and quinoa in pan and cover.
  3. Place in microwave on the following settings:

RC 22

MW

   

RC 30

MW

Stage 1

4:00

100%

Stage 1

2:00

100%

Stage 2

5:00

50%

Stage 2

3:00

50%

Stage 3

3:00

40%

Stage 3

2:00

40%

Remove from microwave, uncover, and let sit for 5 minutes.  Stir.

GREEK QUINOA SALAD

greek salad quinoa

  • 2 cups cooked quinoa
  • 2 Roma tomatoes, seeded and small chop
  • 1 cup thinly sliced fresh spinach
  • 1/3 cup finely chopped red onion
  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • ½ teas salt
  • ½ cup crumbled feta cheese
  • Fresh spinach leaves

Procedures:

  1. Place cooked, cooled quinoa in medium bowl.  Add tomatoes, thinly cut spinach leaves and onion.
  2. In a small bowl, whisk together lemon juice, oil, Dijon mustard, and salt. Add quinoa and toss to coat grains.
  3. Arrange fresh spinach leaves on plates. Spoon quinoa mixture over spinach.
  4. Sprinkle with crumbled feta cheese.

Note: Avocado slices are a great addition to this salad party.  Place on top of spinach leaves and top with quinoa.

greek-salad-quinoa

Xpress™ High Speed Combination Ovens for Convenience Stores

Chef's Corner

Because only the best commercial ovens keep your kitchens running like they need to.

Xpress™ High Speed Combination Ovens for Convenience Stores

ID-1009183 (2)

Convenience stores in the United States number 149,000+ and are growing rapidly.  Now considered the new ‘QSR’, food sales within convenience stores enable owners and franchisees to increase margins over gasoline sales by providing craveable food items for take-out and as home meal replacements for busy families. This significantly increases convenience store profit margins.High Speed Combination ovens such as the Xpress™ MXP and Jetwave™ enable hot breakfast and sandwich offerings, pizza, casserole type items, pastry items and entrees from a frozen state, including vegetarian options.  As consumers become aware of higher quality take home food items when filling up their gas tanks, more operators are demanding a perfected cooking platform to execute and deliver these items to consumers.Here are some factors to consider when choosing a High Speed Combination oven to meet customer expectations:

  • Menu and menu extensions
  • Space Allocations
  • Schematics of hot and cold items
  • Customer count
  • Speed of Service
  • Number of menu items
  • Menu extension
  • Additions for menu enhancement
  • ‘Limited Time Only’ specials
  • Oven investment

 ACP, Inc. offers two Xpress™ High Speed Combination ovens for convenience store operations.

The MXP:

  • Cooks foods up to 15 times faster than conventional methods making it ideal for the on-the-go customer.
  •    2200 watts microwave, 2000 watts impinged air, 3000 watts infrared heat.
  • Catalytic converter eliminates need for a ventilation system, reducing start-up cost.
  • Allows cooking programs to be uploaded and shared across locations with standard USB flash drives.
  • Small footprint saves valuable counter space.
  • Intuitive, touch pad controls minimize staff training time.
  • Heats and retherms prepared frozen or refrigerated foods in seconds:
    • Toasts and heats sandwiches in thirty seconds without drying breads.
    • Bakes 6” (15 cm) frozen pizzas in less than two minutes.
    • Bakes fries from frozen in one minute thirty seconds.
    • Heats plain pretzels from frozen in 30 seconds.
  • Programmable up to 360 menu items.
  • Categorize menu up to three levels (ex: Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner).
  • Accommodates a 13 1/2” x13 1/2” x 1” (343 x 343 x 25mm) metal pan (SQ10 pan accessory) for multiple servings.

The Jetwave™:

  • Cooks up to 4 times faster than conventional methods.
  • Features 1400 watts microwave and 2700 watts forced convection for enhanced toasting and browning.
  • Reduces staff training time with intuitive, touch pad controls.
  • Heats and retherms prepared frozen or refrigerated foods in seconds:
    • Toasts and heats sandwiches in forty seconds without drying breads.
    • Bakes 6” (15 cm) frozen pizzas in less than four minutes.
    • Bakes fries from frozen in three minutes.
    • Heats plain pretzels from frozen in two minutes.
  • Allows cooking programs to be uploaded and shared across locations with EZ Card Menu Management System.
  • Programmable up to 100 menu items.

Baking a frozen prepared pizza in an MXP high speed oven:
Product
12” (30.5 cm) Frozen Cheese Pizza

Procedure
Place frozen pizza on top of HEATED, ST10X pizza stone accessory, and bake to the following settings:

Cook Settings (MXP):
Oven temperature: 520°F (270°C)
Stage # 1  Time: 1:00      20% MW     0%  Fan     100% IR
Stage # 2   Time: 1:05      80% MW    40% Fan    100% IR
Stage # 3   Time: 0:20      0%  MW    0% Fan    100% IR

Return on Investment
In addition to impressive time savings, the MXP high speed ovens offer significant return on investment .

pizza

Food Item: Cheese Pizza
Food Cost       Labor/OH    Estimated Cost     Retail     Net Profit
$1.84                   $ 0.73             $2.57                  $5.00          $2.43

Fish Tacos

Chef's Corner

Because only the best commercial ovens keep your kitchens running like they need to.

Fish Tacos

http://www.qsrweb.com/article/127258/Fish-Tacos-gaining-popularity
http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/money/industries/food/2010-07-09-fishtacos09_ST_N.htm
http://restaurant-hospitality.com/trends/why-your-menu-needs-fish-tacos1111

The next culinary facelift might be the rise of gourmet tacos. Hand held seafood entrees, including fish tacos and seafood sliders are one of the fastest growing products on the U.S. restaurant menu venue. Multiple chains, such as The Cheesecake Factory, Long John Silver’s, and California Pizza Kitchen, have added fish tacos to their menu in response to the consumer driven small plate trend and the growing influence of food trucks across the country.

Fish taco lovers can tie into the growing trend by perfectly baking fish for tacos in the MXP with ACP Chef Sandy Gibilisco’s recipe for healthy and light baked fish tacos with a flavorful slaw accompaniment. The MXP22 combines microwave, convection and infra-red radiant heat to produce a perfectly flaky fish with a crispy exterior in only a minute and a half.

fish taco cc

FISH TACOS
1 minute 30 seconds to bake in MXP, 1 minute to assemble

Yield: 6 fish tacos

Ingredients:
• 1 ½ LBS (680 g) flounder or tilapia, thawed, each approximately 4 oz (113 g)
• ½ cup (113 g) reduced fat sour cream
• Juice of 1 lime
• 1 can Rotel Mexican Diced Tomatoes with Lime Juice, juice drained and saved
• 3 cups (210 g) angel hair shredded cabbage, with red cabbage
• ½ teas (1.3 g) cumin
• ½ teas (3 g) salt
• 1 TBS (15 g) olive oil
• 6″ (15 cm) flour tortillas
• Chopped cilantro

Tools:
• MXP 22 oven
• Oven paddle
• Mixing bowl
• Mixing spoon
• Rubber spatula
• ¼ size sheet pan

Directions:

Sauce:

1. Stir together sour cream, ¼ cup (2 oz.) juice from Rotel tomatoes.

Slaw:
2. Mix together: angel hair slaw mix, drained Rotel tomatoes, and juice of one lime.

Fish:
1. Sprinkle fish filets with salt and cumin.
2. Spray ¼ size sheet pan with pan coating.
3. Place in MXP oven on the following one stage setting:

Stage # 1: 1 min 30 seconds  50% MW    30% AIR    100 IR

4. Remove taco shells from oven and sprinkle 1/3 cup (23 g) cabbage mix over.
5. Flake fish and place on top of cabbage mix.
6. Drizzle approximately ¼ cup (2 oz.) of lime dressing over taco.
7. Sprinkle with chopped cilantro.

-Chef Sandy Gibilisco

fish-taco-cc

Coming Soon! JET14 and JET19

Chef's Corner

Because only the best commercial ovens keep your kitchens running like they need to.

Coming Soon! JET14 and JET19

JET-model

Change is coming to the Jetwave! Two new and improved models will be available Fall 2013.
*International 50 Hz model numbers: JET514 and JET519

JET14 (1400 watts of microwave, 2700 watts of convection) – Bakes 4x faster than a conventional oven!

This oven will be replacing the current MCE14 this Fall.  If you currently own the MCE14, some things to note: they both deliver 1400 watts of microwave and have the same footprint.

Watts new?

  • Redesigned air flow provides more even browning of food, increasing flavor, aroma and texture.

Other unique features include:

    • USB menu management system allows user to edit, create, delete, and transfer menu items from the computer to your oven!
    • “Microwave-only mode”: before pre-heating the oven with convection air, the unit can be used like a standard microwave.
    • Removable grease tray traps and collects grease which helps prolong the life of the oven. With regular cleaning, the oven components are protected.
    • No special cookware is needed. Metal pans are accepted. Cavity accepts standard 1/4 sheet pan.

JET19 (1900 watts of microwave, 2700 watts of convection) – Bakes 10x faster than a conventional oven! 

Want even faster cook times than the JET14? Frozen wings are cooked to perfection in under two minutes.** This more powerful oven offers speed while maintaining product quality.The JET19 is approximately 26% faster than the JET14/MCE14.

Differences in cook times between the JET14 and JET19:

Food Item JET14 Cook Time JET19 Cook Time
**Wings (6 oz./170 g) 2:00 1:30
Baked Potato (11 oz./310 g) 4:30 3:45
Fries (8 oz./225 g) 3:00 2:20
Sub Sandwich 1:20 1:00

A basic deli sub sandwich, each heated in the MCE14 and the JET14 are pictured below. Following the same cook time of 1 minute and 20 seconds, note the improved browning pattern differences in the JET model.

panini arrows
Sub in MCE14 (notice local product browning)

JET sub
Sub in the JET14 (notice even product browning)

 

 

Kickoff to Summer

Chef's Corner

Because only the best commercial ovens keep your kitchens running like they need to.

Kickoff to Summer

DSCN0323

With the official start of summer and our Panini grill plate accessory, you can be a year round griller with the MXP22 or Jetwave ovens. This summer, add nutrients, color, and interest to your menu presentations by using our GR10 panini accessory to create grill marks to your vegetables.

These grill plates can fit in both the Jetwave or the MXP22:

DSC04904
GR10 Panini Accessory

Instructions:
1.) Place the Panini grill in the oven to preheat (about 15 minutes).
2.) Spray vegetables with olive oil pan spray and sprinkle lightly with sea salt before placing on the Panini grill with long handled tongs. Use caution.
3.) Cover the plate with one layer of vegetables and “grill” using the following settings**:

MXP22
Oven Temperature: 520˚F (270˚C)
Stage 1
Time: 0:25
Microwave: 20%
Fan: 0%
IR:100%

Jetwave
Oven Temperature: 475˚F (270˚C)
Stage 1
Time: 0:35
Microwave: 10%

**Add more or less time depending on level of grill mark desired

Zucchini
-This can be made more delicious by topping with a retail purchased marinade, after ‘grilling’.

Onions
-When onions are grilled, flavors change from pungent, to sweet.  Cut onions crosswise into ½” (1.5 cm) slices.

Asparagus
-The star of vegetables for grilling. Just seconds in the MXP22 turns it into an even better vegetable!

Bell Peppers
-Cut into  large chunks or ½” (1.5 cm) rings.  They will char around the edges and turn extra sweet, just like grilling them outdoors.

Quick, easy, and healthy, these vegetables look and taste great with our hi-speed combination ovens. Try out some other foods such as mushrooms, eggplants, and even pineapple!

dscn0323